Telemedicine is defined as “the use of electronic information and communications technologies to provide and support health care when distance separates the participants.” (National Academy of Sciences, 1996)

Help For Low Energy

One of the most common health complaints is low energy. While this is an issue that can range from the young to the old, research shows that as we age the storehouse of the body’s energy, the mitochondria decrease in function. Traditional Asian Medicine shows this as well, as a precious substance called “Jing”, which is responsible for vitality decreases with age.

In Traditional Asian Medicine there are many causes why someone may have low energy. These causes include digestion (related to the earth element), respiratory system (associated with the metal element), and adrenal functioning (correlating to the water element). And there are even more factors that can contribute to low energy. Rather than get into more complicated Traditional Asian Medicine theory, let’s get to some solutions. Here are some of the key everyday factors that can affect energy levels with solutions.

1. Dehydration
Many people are dehydrated. Dehydration can decrease energy because when the cells of the body are not properly hydrated, vital nutrients are unable to be distributed for energy production. Also, from a Traditional Asian Medicine standpoint, lack of hydration decreases body fluids and what is called yin energy which can directly impact energy levels. Solution: Drink more water, ideally half your body’s weight in room temperature fluid ounces spread out throughout the day. But remember to not drink too late at night so that you don’t have to wake to urinate.

2. Digestion
It is not only what we eat that can affect how much energy we have, it’s also what our body does with what we eat. Solution: Eat plenty of nutrient dense whole foods like organic vegetables, healthy protein and good quality grain, in moderation. Also, make certain to have cooked foods, as well as eliminate foods that can clog up digestion like fatty, fried foods, and dairy products. This can help the body to better extract nutrients so it can make good fuel.

3. Insufficient Good Quality Sleep
If you are not sleeping and resting well at night, it is more likely that you will feel tired in the morning and/or throughout the day. Good quality sleep is essential for so many of our bodies functions. Solution: From a Traditional Asian Medicine standpoint, there are a variety of causes and remedies to help improve sleep. One thing that anyone can do to improve sleep is to not look at a screen for an hour or two before bed, unless wearing amber glasses. Amber glasses help to lesson blue light from entering the retina, which negatively impact melatonin levels and restful sleep. Also staying properly hydrated during the day can help to improve quality of sleep. This can be particularly helpful for those who experience heavy cycles or are perimenopausal/menopausal.

Additionally
While it can be hard to exercise if you feel tired, exercise can help you to have more energy. Obviously, it’s just getting started 😊. A wonderful gentle exercise and one of my favorite ways to increase energy is Qi Gong, an ancient healing art that combines movement, focus and breath (click here to register for a drop in Qi Gong class only available for the month of October).

There are also herbs that can help to promote energy such as ginseng, and vitamins, like B-Complex, but before taking that and many others herbs and supplements, it is best to be evaluated by a competent health practitioner. This helps to ensure that a particular herb or supplement is best for your health goals, does not counteract with any medications, etc. For assistance getting to the roots of your low energy, click here to schedule a virtual consultation. Take good care.

Love being a woman,
Dr. Danett

2 comments

  1. Comment by Oriel

    Oriel October 5, 2020 at 8:45 am

    Dr. Danette,
    I enjoyed reading your article with tips to become more energized and yes, I practice most of your tidbits and overall have good energy throughout the day. However, my energy lags upon waking despite sleeping well at night. I’ve noticed since mid August, this has been a pattern. I just never wake up with a burst of energy, I tend to lay there for at least another half hour. Any recommendations?

  2. Comment by Dr. Danett

    Dr. Danett October 8, 2020 at 11:30 am

    Hi Oriel, so glad you enjoyed reading the article! Sounds like there may be some energetic imbalance. I suggest that you join my upcoming Keeping It In Harmony Qi Gong and Healing Series and schedule a reassessment consultation, since it’s been longer than a season since we’ve done an intake. You can schedule your consultation by clicking here and selecting “Reassessment Consultation”. All the best!

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